About Me

My photo

A cure for Wolfram syndrome could lead to a cure for diabetes.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Moving to the Washington University Medical Center website

Dear Friends,

We are moving to the Washington University Medical Center website. We will make the most informative and helpful web for our patients, families, physicians, researchers, and general public. We will closely work with patient organizations.

Information about Wolfram syndrome
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/
My blog
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/dr-uranos-blog/

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
urano@dom.wustl.edu
314-362-8683

Fumi Urano
Kindest regards,


Friday, November 14, 2014

Wolfram syndrome website at Washington University Medical Center

We have created an website specifically designed for Wolfram syndrome patients, families, physicians, and researchers. Our aim is to create the most useful and informative site and platform for patients with Wolfram syndrome. We plan to keep on adding information to this site.
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/

Most of my previous blogs have been transferred to this site. I plan to move my blog there.
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/dr-uranos-blog/

The site is managed by a wonderful information technology specialist. I cannot thank you enough for her efforts.

Kindly,

Fumi Urano

Insulin-producing cells and brain cells in Wolfram syndrome

In Wolfram syndrome, insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells and brain cells selectively degenerate. Other cells, such skin cells and immune cells, are healthy. Why are beta cells and brain cells so sensitive to the loss of function of Wolfram gene?

It has been recently suggested that beta cells and brain cells have many common features. My hunch is that brain cells and brain-like cells, including beta cells, are sensitive to dysregulated calcium homeostasis. So if we can modulate cellular calcium homeostasis using small molecules, we can potentially delay the progression of Wolfram syndrome. We have preclinical data supporting this model. We can disclose the information soon.

Thank you for reading this. I hope you have a wonderful day.

Kindly,
Fumi Urano
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Dr. Banting

Today is our Diabetes Research Center's Diabetes Day. We will present our progress on the development of therapeutics and diagnostics for Wolfram syndrome.

The father of diabetes research is Dr. Banting who discovered insulin. His research led to the insulin therapy for patients with diabetes. Here is an interesting blog about him.
http://diabetesdad.org/2014/11/12/this-man-saved-your-your-childs-life-what-do-you-know-about-him/

I hope you have a wonderful day.

Kindest regards,
Fumi Urano
http://wolframsyndrome.dom.wustl.edu/

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Brain Functions and Medication

Patients with Wolfram syndrome face multiple challenges in addition to diabetes. That's why I always feel that Wolfram is the most difficult form of diabetes. Mood swings, anxiety, and depression are commonly seen. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these symptoms are not clear, we assume that these are related to the dysregulation of neurotransmitter secretion. Endoplasmic reticulum is involved in the maturation and secretion of secreted factors in the brain cells, and Wolfram protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory granules.

Because Wolfram is diabetes with brain cell dysfunction, our candidate drugs should pass the blood-brain barrier. Many drugs cannot reach the brain because blood vessels in the brain have a special structure called the blood-brain barrier. I always make sure that our candidate drugs pass the blood-brain barrier and reach brain cells. 

Thank you for reading this. I would like to send kind thoughts toward you. I would like you to stay optimistic. Thank you again.

Take care,
Fumi Urano